American Singer – Tina Mania http://tinamania.com/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 21:43:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://tinamania.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1-150x150.png American Singer – Tina Mania http://tinamania.com/ 32 32 Joe Bussard, great collector of American roots music on 78 rpm, dies at 86 https://tinamania.com/joe-bussard-great-collector-of-american-roots-music-on-78-rpm-dies-at-86/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 20:59:05 +0000 https://tinamania.com/joe-bussard-great-collector-of-american-roots-music-on-78-rpm-dies-at-86/ Joe Bussard, who began collecting rare American jazz, blues, country and gospel recordings as a teenager and built one of the world’s largest private collections of 78 rpm records, died September 26 at his home in Frederick, Maryland. He was 86. The cause was complications from pancreatic cancer, said her daughter, Susannah Anderson. Mr. Bussard, […]]]>

Joe Bussard, who began collecting rare American jazz, blues, country and gospel recordings as a teenager and built one of the world’s largest private collections of 78 rpm records, died September 26 at his home in Frederick, Maryland. He was 86.

The cause was complications from pancreatic cancer, said her daughter, Susannah Anderson.

Mr. Bussard, an enthusiastic conversationalist and storyteller – as long as the subject was music – started collecting records after hearing a Jimmie Rodgers song on the radio. “It was like a bombshell when I heard that,” he told The Washington Post this year. “I wanted all the Jimmie Rodgers records I could get.”

This raw, pure sound of early American music captivated him, and he spent the rest of his life researching recordings made before the mass production and increasingly homogenized culture that ruined music, he says. .

Over the decades, he took long road trips through Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia and the Carolinas, sometimes even farther south, stopping at gas stations, houses hidden deep in the hollers and small town general stores, all looking for the 78s that many people were. more than happy to offload at little or no cost.

“I learned to know exactly when to go on and when to stop,” he wrote in his entry in “The Encyclopedia of Collectibles,” a 1978 volume published by Time-Life Books. “I would stop if I saw a house that wasn’t overly painted, with old-fashioned trellises, maybe a stained-glass window in the door or a lace curtain. To me, this house just screamed, ‘Old records! Between!’ ”

He remembered the adrenaline rush when he came across a particularly rare and valuable recording, some of which were worth hundreds or thousands of dollars. As he told the Post in May, “Oh boy, oh boy, oh boy. I had to hold my hands to keep them from shaking.

This year, Mr. Bussard said there were about 15,000 records left in his basement, although he once had more than 20,000. The records filled every square inch of the shelves he had built for them. in the 1960s. They were kept in identical green paper sleeves and arranged in an order that only he knew – and never disclosed.

But far from being a hoarder, Mr. Bussard wanted anyone interested to experience the same happiness he enjoyed listening to the records. He played the records on radio shows he hosted and made tape recordings, and eventually CDs, which he shipped – for a fee – around the country and around the world. And he invited anyone who wanted to stop by for a listen.

The quality of Mr. Bussard’s collection, which has been compared to the Library of Congress’ collections of traditional American recorded music in scope and quality, astounded those who came in contact with it.

“It’s one of the greatest glories, probably the finest in the world,” the late music scholar Tom Hoskins said in a 1999 Washington City Paper History on the files that Mr. Bussard had amassed. “He was canvassing earlier than most, and he’s been at it longer, and he took it all: he recognized things that he really didn’t like at the time, but he recognized them as being good, and he kept them.”

“Almost mystical,” is how Ken Brooks, a 78-year-old collector from Indiana who has befriended Mr. Bussard over the years, described his collection to the Post this year. “It’s so deep and wide. He has blues records that no one else has. Country records that no one else has. Jazz records that no one else has.

Joseph Edward Bussard Jr. was born in Frederick, Maryland on July 11, 1936, to a family that owned a farm supply business. He dropped out of Frederick High School in his first year worked for the family business, was a supermarket clerk, and had other short-lived jobs that allowed him to spend countless hours collecting music. He also spent eight years in the National Guard before that also interfered with his fixation.

As a child, he told the Baltimore Sun, he loved Westerns and Gene Autry’s country recordings, but he felt “something was wrong, like there had to be something more.” “. He said an epiphany came around 1948, when he heard Rodgers and instantly felt a lightning connection, a sense of authenticity in a world that seemed content with the artificial.

At first he was mainly interested in country songs recorded in the 1920s and 1930s, but his tastes widened to include early jazz, blues and gospel performers who recorded for Gennett, Vocalion, OKeh and a number number of now obscure labels. In a West Virginia coal town, he found what he called “the rarest of all country blues records”. “The Original Stack O’Lee Blues” made by Long Cleve Reed and Little Harvey Hull for the short-lived Black Patti label in 1927.

A savior of abandoned American music contemplates his collection

As enthusiastic as Mr. Bussard was about the music he liked, he was even more dismissive of the music he disliked, namely everything that followed the replacement of 78s by 45s and then LP and possibly CDs. He barely tolerated big bands led by Artie Shaw and Benny Goodman (“like watching the ice melt”). And forget about anything recorded after 1950, especially Elvis Presley, the Beatles and “all that rock and roll shit”. He poked fun at country stars such as Johnny Cash and Patsy Cline and rolled her eyes at the mention of pop.

When rap hit the scene, he pointed to something he considered superior: the 1920s blues recording of the Beale Street Sheiks of “This is a good thing” “They don’t call it rap, but it is,” he insisted to an Associated Press reporter.

In addition to collecting, he also formed a music group, Jolly Joe’s Jug Band, and for several years had his own label, Fonotone, recording musicians at home, including influential guitarist and composer John Fahey.

Featured in documentaries, books, and countless articles, the often cantankerous Mr. Bussard was never happier than when he entertained guests in his basement and could amaze them with music they never wanted. had perhaps never had the chance to hear.

His daughter estimated that at least 150 people a year spent time with Mr. Bussard at home to listen to him play songs and tell stories about how he found the records, how many (or how many) he had paid, which musicians were playing on it. and what year they were released.

A few years ago, Jack White, lead singer and guitarist of the White Stripes, spent an afternoon with Mr. Bussard listening to old records – and listening to Mr. Bussard talk about them. He remembered Mr. Bussard pulling out a jazz record, playing it on a modern turntable and pretending it would sound like the band was playing live in the basement.

“I was like, okay, whatever, roll my eyes, and then fuck it, if he wasn’t right,” White told the Post. “Thirty seconds into this song, I was like, ‘Whoa, whoa, whoa, wait a minute. What is this? Who recorded this? What speaker are we listening to this through? “What amplifier are you using? Because, damn you weren’t kidding, it looks like this band is in the room with us right now.”

“I just thought, wow, what a wonderful thing he’s done for me.”

Mr. Bussard’s wife of 34 years, the former Esther Keith, deceased in 1999. Their marriage was sometimes strained by Mr. Bussard’s musical obsession, she told the City Paper. His singular focus, she said, made him “very, very hard to live with.” She worked as a cosmetologist to support her husband’s family and music collection.

Survivors include her daughter, Frederick, and three granddaughters.

Anderson says she hasn’t decided what to do with the recordings yet. For now, she plans to leave them alone.

“I almost can’t even get into the room. It’s like a museum or some kind of sanctuary,” she said. “It’s a bond with him.”

For his part, Mr. Bussard was not particular about the ultimate fate of the discs, except that he did not want them to go to a university or a library where he thought they would just pick up dust.

“I like to say I’m going to enjoy them until I croak,” he said in May. “So whatever they do with them is fine.”

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New owners of Hildebrandt’s in Williston Park save a 1920s ice cream parlor https://tinamania.com/new-owners-of-hildebrandts-in-williston-park-save-a-1920s-ice-cream-parlor/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 02:02:42 +0000 https://tinamania.com/new-owners-of-hildebrandts-in-williston-park-save-a-1920s-ice-cream-parlor/ WILLISTON PARK, NY — As the 1920s roared on, Henry Hildebrandt opened a cafeteria and ice cream parlor in Williston Park, New York. It was a time when stores like Hildebrandt were the heart of America’s downtowns. But slowly they left, so numerous that at the start of the 21st century Hildebrandt was among the […]]]>

WILLISTON PARK, NY — As the 1920s roared on, Henry Hildebrandt opened a cafeteria and ice cream parlor in Williston Park, New York. It was a time when stores like Hildebrandt were the heart of America’s downtowns.

But slowly they left, so numerous that at the start of the 21st century Hildebrandt was among the last of their kind. The Long Island restaurant was so unique it became an Instagram darling, its storefront hailed as one of the most beautiful in America.

And then, Hildebrandt’s has almost become a statistic, a memory like all the others that have been missed and mourned. In 2020 a new owner raised rents and the family that has run the place since 1974 raised the white flag – Hildebrandt would close unless a miracle happened.

Well, a miracle happened this year on Super Bowl Sunday. The Los Angeles Rams weren’t the only winners that night.

That’s when Randy Sarf and his dad came in for some ice cream. Sarf was a regular at Hildebrandt’s – it was the place to grow up – and when then-owner Bryan Acosta confirmed that the ice cream parlor was doomed, Sarf decided on the spot: “We’re going to save the place.”

And he put his money where his mouth is, he said, buying two stuffed tigers the store was selling — appropriately, the Cincinnati Bengals were the other team playing that night — for $1,000.

That was just Sarf’s kick off. He quickly brought in his cousin, Spencer Singer, and they bought the place on a 10-year deal to start a business that would thrive for at least another century. With Sarf’s business chops and Singer’s background in crafts including fashion, they put their complementary skills to work.

“It’s a special place for him. And Nassau County and beyond,” Singer said of how Sarf and so many others view Hildebrandt. “When I first came back to this place, I knew it straight away. I was hooked.”

Indeed, they pledged not just to keep Hildebrandt open, but to revitalize it.

These careful alterations will highlight its historic character – like revealing a long-hidden tin ceiling – while making changes to the menu while preserving classic dishes that customers crave, like the cheeseburger.

And they make sure the crown jewel gets the shine and stardom it deserves – ice cream. It’s made on-site, comes in more than a dozen flavors, and forms the basis for Hildebrandt’s expansion beyond its nearly century-old house.

“We’re going to stay true to what Hildebrandt is,” Singer said. “We see Hildebrandt not just as this great community staple, we see it as a brand, and we want people to enjoy it from afar. So ice cream is really the way we’re going to be for another 100 years. want to sell the ice cream nationwide. We want to wholesale it to local markets, local restaurants, and then bring it directly to the consumer. After we renovate, we will grow with the ice cream.

The place looks like a 1960s movie set, its vintage charm everywhere. Indeed, it is exactly that, appearing in a scene from Martin Scorsese’s “The Irishman.” It’s easy to see why he’s popular, and while filming Localish the other day, Singer and Sarf made sure customers were well and the service was impeccable, while sharing their vision of a dynamic Hildebrandt.

Singer, seated by the front door for the interview, greeted each customer. “Hi ladies, how are you? Any table you wish,” was one of many warm greetings Singer extended to the lunchtime crowd.

Indeed, it’s all about family, which extends to long-serving employees, whom Sarf made sure would stay. Even the previous owners remain as the new era begins at Hildebrandt.

“This place really means a lot to me and my family,” said Hunter Acosta, who had managed Hildebrandt with his father, Bryan. “We were about a month away from closing and then Randy and Spencer came along and saved the day. We’ve known Randy and his family for a really long time. It’s really cool to have a family my family knows to take over. .”

Singer and Sarf say they have a plan and the means, and everyone from neighbors on Long Island to admirers of vintage architecture around the world have their backs.

“I was here the other day, and there were four generations at a table,” Singer said. “I mean it’s crazy, it’s wild.”

He revealed the recipe for success, and it’s short and sweet: “It’s family first, it’s community and it’s ice cream. It’s a new adventure every day.”

Copyright © 2022 WABC-TV. All rights reserved.

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American singer Pink Sweat$ finds success in “super positive” music https://tinamania.com/american-singer-pink-sweat-finds-success-in-super-positive-music/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://tinamania.com/american-singer-pink-sweat-finds-success-in-super-positive-music/ MANILA, Philippines — It’s not every day you get serenaded during an interview. That’s exactly what Pink Sweat$ did. He burst into his viral love song At Your Worst, which now has over 162 million views on YouTube, while answering questions about why he just wants his music to make you smile. The American singer-songwriter, […]]]>

MANILA, Philippines — It’s not every day you get serenaded during an interview. That’s exactly what Pink Sweat$ did. He burst into his viral love song At Your Worst, which now has over 162 million views on YouTube, while answering questions about why he just wants his music to make you smile.

The American singer-songwriter, who found his happiness in R&B and songs steeped in love and soul (his other hits are Honesty, I Feel Good, 17), said in a chat virtual band before his Sept. 27 Manila gig: “I try to be mindful with a lot of the music I do. Sometimes I just have fun. But most of the time I want to send out a super positive, just happy message because it’s not every day you hear a lot of happy and uplifting vibes, you know… I want the listener, after having listened to the music, feeling refreshed, like the man, ‘It was beautiful.’ I like this.”

He is intentional about the mood and message of his songs, due to his own experience of music when he went through challenges in life.

According to Billboard, Pink Sweat$ decided to become a singer after a “near-death experience” with a rare condition called Achalasia that affected her esophagus.

“I always want to write uplifting music because when I was going through a lot of things in my life that I couldn’t control, like health issues or whatever, it was so hard to find positive music,” said Pink Sweat$ in a response to a question from the STAR.

“It was so hard to find things that made me feel good about my day or that gave me hope for my relationship, about love, about family, about all those things.

“I’m like, man, how can I make a change? I gotta be that change and start putting the energy out there for the next person that’s going through it. So many people have been messaging me on Honesty, At My Worst, like “I was going through this tough breakup, I was feeling really down, I don’t know if I’ll ever find love” and then they listen to these songs and they just trigger something in them, you know, l love will come when it wants, i just can’t give up and someone will love me at worst.

“It’s special to me because…you know what it’s like to be hungry?” The best thing you can do is feed someone else. You are a giver for the energy to return. You feed someone and all of a sudden someone comes along and brings you a whole meal. This is how the universe works.

The Philadelphia-born artist, whose real name is David Bowden, entered the music scene at 19 as a demo singer. Soon after, he found himself working at the famed Sigma Sounds studios where he made his debut as a songwriter. For seven years, it stayed behind the scenes before going solo in 2018.

Nonetheless, he considers himself a songwriter/producer first, and over the past year has collaborated with artists like Justin Bieber and John Legend, as well as K-pop artists like Seventeen, GOT7’s Bambam, Jeon Somi and more recently, P1Harmony. . He’s big in Korea with his album, Pink Planet, which went 5x platinum there. On Spotify, it averages more than nine million monthly listeners, with Quezon City as the Top 2 in its audience.

When he reflected on his journey so far, Pink Sweat$ still seemed overwhelmed with where he was now.

He shared, “It’s like 80% wrestling and the 20% is all you end up seeing. But the 20 percent is so great. It makes the whole struggle at 80% worth it.

“It was a very difficult journey trying to figure out where to go, where to be. Music is one of those things where you have to do the best quality possible and just wait. It’s a waiting game. You are just waiting for your shot, and just waiting for your turn and your opportunity.

“I’m super grateful that my opportunity came and I was prepared for it. It’s kind of lucky. But every time I think about it, I feel so grateful. Now I’m just in a happy place Life is beautiful I pray every night for people to experience and feel what I have (and) feel right now.

Based on his learnings in navigating the industry, his advice to those just starting out is, “No. 1. Get to know yourself, get to know who makes you smile, whatever kind of music, whatever your thing, whatever makes you smile, perfect it.

“No. 2. Never be afraid to say no. Sometimes, especially in entertainment, things go so fast and you say yes, yes, yes. But never be afraid to say no because sometimes no is more powerful I like giving that to people because it’s easy to say yes, it’s hard. Especially when you really want to do something, like, ‘man, I shouldn’t do that.’ Just say no.”

Amid his career’s upward trajectory, Pink Sweat$ said he never felt like he ever made it because “I don’t make music to do that. I make music because it’s something I really love.

“When I was like, oh I did it or I didn’t, it’s not really a good space to be. Where I come from, as a songwriter, it has always been music to me, it’s not about how many people will know my name All those things are fun, but to me I want to make music, and I can make a living, take care of our bills, our family and everything. I live life.

“Every creative person really wants to, deep down, just make music and be stress free. We want to impact people’s lives. But I appreciate people clapping but I really do it because music makes me happy. gives life. I don’t think I’ll be the same person if I don’t create music.

(Pink Sweat$ arrives in Manila on September 27, Tuesday, 8 p.m., at the New Frontier Theater. It’s her first time in the country, as part of an Asian tour supporting her debut album Pink Moon. For more details , contact concert organizer Live Nation Philippines at [email protected] or consult www.livenation.ph or its official social media accounts.)

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Stunned to coach El Tri instead of Martino, now he’s a rap singer https://tinamania.com/stunned-to-coach-el-tri-instead-of-martino-now-hes-a-rap-singer/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 23:57:24 +0000 https://tinamania.com/stunned-to-coach-el-tri-instead-of-martino-now-hes-a-rap-singer/ Martino’s potential replacement is now a rap singer. September 22, 2022, 5:57 p.m. Following the dismissal of Juan Carlos Osorio from the Mexican national team, the Mexican Football Federation evaluated different profiles until arriving at the decision to bring Gerardo Martin from Atlanta United. One of those candidates was a world-class coach who now seems […]]]>
Martino’s potential replacement is now a rap singer.

Following the dismissal of Juan Carlos Osorio from the Mexican national team, the Mexican Football Federation evaluated different profiles until arriving at the decision to bring Gerardo Martin from Atlanta United. One of those candidates was a world-class coach who now seems to be venturing into music.

The thing is, the coach is one of the most recognized coaches in Europe and that’s why his profile caught the attention of Mexico. He won several championships in Italy, Spain and England. He is also a two-time UEFA Champions League winner.

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More related news:

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Messi’s partner who dislikes Mbappé, Argentina’s solid numbers scare France

It is precisely the coach of AS Roma, Jose Mourinho who could have come to the Mexican national team, but ended up finding an agreement with Martino. Now the Portuguese coach has appeared in Stormzy’s new music video.

Will Mourinho turn to rap?

The presence of “The Special One” in the rapper’s video was surprising to say the least. The fact is that the coach does not say a single word, but the image has gone extremely viral on all social networks after being seen in the video.

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American pop-rockers OneRepublic return to Singapore for a concert in February https://tinamania.com/american-pop-rockers-onerepublic-return-to-singapore-for-a-concert-in-february/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 05:33:59 +0000 https://tinamania.com/american-pop-rockers-onerepublic-return-to-singapore-for-a-concert-in-february/ SINGAPORE – American group OneRepublic will return to Singapore to perform at the Star Theater on February 28. The show will be part of an Asian tour that includes concerts in Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines and Japan. Ticketing details have yet to be released. Known for pop-rock hits like Counting Stars (2013), Apologize (2007) and […]]]>

SINGAPORE – American group OneRepublic will return to Singapore to perform at the Star Theater on February 28.

The show will be part of an Asian tour that includes concerts in Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines and Japan. Ticketing details have yet to be released.

Known for pop-rock hits like Counting Stars (2013), Apologize (2007) and Secrets (2009), the band are currently surfing the worldwide hit single I Ain’t Worried, from the soundtrack to the mega-hit box- office and Tom Cruise. – with the action blockbuster Top Gun: Maverick (2022).

OneRepublic has performed in Singapore several times, including the Star Theater in 2018 and the Singapore Airlines F1 Grand Prix in Singapore in 2017.

Formed in 2002, they are fronted by singer Ryan Tedder, also known as a hitmaker in his own right who has co-written songs with other music stars including Lady Gaga, Beyonce, Paul McCartney and U2.

OneRepublic has released five albums, including their debut Dreaming Out Loud (2007) and their most recent, Human (2021).

OneRepublic – Live Concert

Where: The Star Theatre, The Star Performing Arts Centre, 1 Vista Exchange Green
When: February 28 (2023)
Admission: Ticketing details to come.

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Elvis Presley thought an American star had “the perfect voice” | Music | Entertainment https://tinamania.com/elvis-presley-thought-an-american-star-had-the-perfect-voice-music-entertainment/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 08:38:30 +0000 https://tinamania.com/elvis-presley-thought-an-american-star-had-the-perfect-voice-music-entertainment/ Elvis Presley has been called the greatest rock and roll band of all time – but even he had his heroes. Just as the Beatles were heavily inspired by Elvis and his work, King had a hugely famous American star he looked up to. Years into his career, Elvis even toured with this musician – […]]]>

Elvis Presley has been called the greatest rock and roll band of all time – but even he had his heroes. Just as the Beatles were heavily inspired by Elvis and his work, King had a hugely famous American star he looked up to.

Years into his career, Elvis even toured with this musician – otherwise known as The Big O – and spent weeks on the road with him.

Elvis adored American Rockabilly singer Roy Orbison. The rocker was best known for introducing a harder vocal tone to the music industry. He sported a black, slicked back haircut and wide Ray Bans which became his signature look. These characteristics were also partially adopted by Elvis over the years.

The singer was one of the biggest entertainers around throughout the 1950s. In many ways, he laid the groundwork for the likes of Elvis and the Beatles to take over music in a major way.

At the time, he had sold over 7 million albums worldwide – which was no small feat. But above all, he received the unwavering respect of Elvis Presley.

While on stage at his residency shows in Las Vegas, Elvis told his audience that Orbison was “the greatest singer in the world.”

Elvis was also extremely respectful of the singer. Throughout his decades-long career, he’s covered many artist tracks while performing live, including The Beatles, Frank Sinatra and many more.

But Elvis refused to cover any of Orbison’s songs. He reportedly felt that he couldn’t “sing any of Roy’s songs better than the original recordings”.

He later commented that Orbison had “the most perfect voice”.

The respect Elvis had for Orbison was not one-sided, however. In fact, Orbison made it a point to attend as many shows as possible from 1954 to 1976.

READ MORE: Enraged Elvis Presley berated his critics for his religion

Orbison went to Elvis’ mansion, Graceland, and knocked on the door. He told the doorman he had a song to hand him.

Unfortunately for him, Elvis was not at home. And the doorman told him he probably wouldn’t be interested in the song.

Orbison was deflated by this news, but didn’t give up. He also tried to introduce him to the Everly Brothers – but they weren’t interested either.

Eventually Orbison recorded Only the Lonely and released it under his own name.

It became the only song he ever released that reached number two on the US charts. During this time, it went straight to number one in the UK.

THE SOURCE

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TIFF: “Carry It On” is a tribute to the life of Canadian-American Indigenous singer-songwriter Buffy Sainte-Marie | India is blooming https://tinamania.com/tiff-carry-it-on-is-a-tribute-to-the-life-of-canadian-american-indigenous-singer-songwriter-buffy-sainte-marie-india-is-blooming/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 08:29:18 +0000 https://tinamania.com/tiff-carry-it-on-is-a-tribute-to-the-life-of-canadian-american-indigenous-singer-songwriter-buffy-sainte-marie-india-is-blooming/ The life, music and activism of Canadian-American singer-songwriter Sainte-Marie has broken down barriers to become an inspiration to fans and fellow musicians. Now, a documentary premiering at TIFF captures it all. Directed by Madison Thomas and starred onscreen by Madison Thomas and legendary Indigenous singer-songwriter Andrea Warner, Buffy Sainte-Marie’s documentary “Carry It On” had its […]]]>

The life, music and activism of Canadian-American singer-songwriter Sainte-Marie has broken down barriers to become an inspiration to fans and fellow musicians. Now, a documentary premiering at TIFF captures it all.

Directed by Madison Thomas and starred onscreen by Madison Thomas and legendary Indigenous singer-songwriter Andrea Warner, Buffy Sainte-Marie’s documentary “Carry It On” had its world premiere at the 47th Toronto International Film Festival ( TIFF) depicting Sainte-Marie’s life, music and activism breaking down barriers to become an inspiration to fans and fellow musicians.

Directed by Lisa Meeches and Stephen Paniccia in Canada in 2022 from production companies Eagle Vision and White Pine Pictures, and edited by Brina Romanek, the documentary is an inspiring biography of Sainte-Marie, as well as a testimony to the tribute paid to the life and career of Sainte-Marie.

She was the first Indigenous person to win an Oscar in 1983 for Best Original Song “Up Where We Belong” which was co-written by her and featured in An Officer and a Gentleman). Additionally, she was also the first recurring Native guest star on Sesame Street.

Being more than just a singer, Sainte-Marie’s integrity and insistence on tackling topics that others were reluctant to earn her great respect.

When she appeared on the television show The Virginian in 1968, she asked producers to hire native actors. She remains one of the few pop artists to refuse to have her rights bought out by Elvis.

For this reason, she was targeted. Angered by his activism, the FBI demanded that radio stations refuse to play his records in an attempt to derail his career.

With her art and activism deeply intertwined, Sainte-Marie is also withdrawn and said she really shouldn’t be the only Native North American to win the Oscar so far.

The documentary features Buffy Sainte-Marie, Joni Mitchell, Robbie Robertson, John Kay, Jackson Browne, Taj Mahal, Sonia Manzano, George Stroumboulopoulos, Jeremy Dutcher, and filmed by Gabriel Levesque, Andy Hourahine and Jon Elliott.

The film is publicized by V Kelly & Associates and distributed by White Pine Pictures of Canada.

Winnipeg-born filmmaker Madison Thomas was nominated for a 2018 Canadian Screen Award for her work on the award-winning series Taken. Its features include Ruthless Souls (19). Buffy Sainte-Marie: Carry It On (22) is her last film.

(Reporting by Asha Bajaj)

Image: Carry It On by Buffy Sainte-Marie. Image credit: TIFF

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Biden to participate in Hispanic Heritage Month flagship event https://tinamania.com/biden-to-participate-in-hispanic-heritage-month-flagship-event/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 16:22:43 +0000 https://tinamania.com/biden-to-participate-in-hispanic-heritage-month-flagship-event/ President Biden is due to attend the key event celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month in Washington. Hosted by the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute (CHCI), the annual awards gala hosts a who’s who of Latinos in politics, culture and advocacy. Biden’s attendance at the 45th annual gala is the first by a president since former President Obama […]]]>

President Biden is due to attend the key event celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month in Washington.

Hosted by the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute (CHCI), the annual awards gala hosts a who’s who of Latinos in politics, culture and advocacy.

Biden’s attendance at the 45th annual gala is the first by a president since former President Obama delivered a speech at the 39th in 2016.

“This is an example of the commitment of our country’s most senior leaders to our community and the desire to engage directly with us – to talk to us, to hear from us, to learn more about our needs and our desires,” said Marco Davis, CEO of CHCI.

From 1979 to 2016, every sitting president has been invited to speak at the gala, and only former President George HW Bush was unable to attend while in office.

But in 2017, CHCI broke with tradition and did not invite former President Trump after pardoning Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio and announcing a plan to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

CHCI’s primary function is to train young Hispanics who wish to work in government, and its intern classes typically include a number of DACA recipients.

“The president was not invited this year because of his slanderous comments and actions that were highly offensive to the Latino community in the United States,” CHCI president’s representative Joaquin Castro (D) said at the time. -Texas).

Trump also did not attend or speak at subsequent galas, and the coronavirus pandemic forced CHCI to hold the event online in 2020 and 2021.

Biden has twice participated as a keynote speaker in the virtual editions, sending video messages as the 2020 Democratic presidential nominee and as the 2021 gala chair.

“When we were virtual, it was definitely a very different experience. I will say the president sent a video message that we were able to play when we were virtual last fall, so technically he participated…but him being [there] in person is a very different thing,” Davis said.

The return of the gala is a boon for Hispanics in Beltway, who sometimes call the event “Latino Prom” or “Brown Prom,” in reference to the White House Correspondents’ Dinner’s tongue-in-cheek nickname of “Nerd Prom.”

Although CHCI and its parent institution, the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, are nonpartisan, both groups are more closely associated with Democrats.

Still, the CHCI gala has historically brought together Democratic, Republican, and unaffiliated Hispanics with an interest in political leadership.

The 2022 event will posthumously honor Celia Cruz, the celebrated Cuban-American singer, with the 2022 Medallion of Excellence Award. Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra will receive the 2022 American Dream Medallion Award.

Retired Representatives Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-Calif.) and Albio Sires (DN.J.), Associate Justice of the Superior Court of the District of Columbia Kenia Seoane López, and CHCI alumnus Marvin Figueroa, will also receive awards . who heads the Office of Intergovernmental and External Affairs of the US Department of Health and Human Services.

Hispanic Heritage Month begins on September 15, Mexico’s Independence Day, and ends on October 15.

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Kho Lads Racers in the final at Rivercut GC https://tinamania.com/kho-lads-racers-in-the-final-at-rivercut-gc/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 22:12:53 +0000 https://tinamania.com/kho-lads-racers-in-the-final-at-rivercut-gc/ History links The Murray State women’s golf team finished its first fall event with a 12e venue showing at the Payne Stewart Memorial at the Rivercut Golf Course in Springfield, Missouri. The Racers improved over the 54-hole event with scores of 312-310-309=931. Murray State’s Peyton Carter led the Racers […]]]>

The Murray State women’s golf team finished its first fall event with a 12e venue showing at the Payne Stewart Memorial at the Rivercut Golf Course in Springfield, Missouri.

The Racers improved over the 54-hole event with scores of 312-310-309=931.

Murray State’s Peyton Carter led the Racers with a spot in 40e place on laps of 78-76-77=231, Eliza Ma Kho had the lowest lap of the day for the Racers and improved to finish 51st up to rounds 81-77-75=233. Alma Garcia placed 54e on rounds of 77-78-79=234 and McKenna Stahl placed 64e on the scores of 76-81-81=238 and Ellie West placed 72n/a on the scores of 85-79-78=242. Kaitlyn Zieba placed 72n/a on scores of 79-84-79=242, like her and Catherine Weir played solo. Weir finished 76e on scores of 78-81-84=243. West, Weir and Zieba are freshmen and played their first event as Racers.

Oklahoma City was declared the team winner on a countdown over Missouri State, with each team scoring 879. UTEP (882), Creighton (886) and Arkansas State (887) completed the top 5.

Maddie Kamas of Oklahoma City won the medal title with scores of 74-73-68=215.

The next challenge for the Racers is an appearance at the Austin Peay Intercollegiate (September 26-27) at Clarksville Country Club in Clarksville, Tennessee.

Payne Stewart Memorial
Rivercut GC – Springfield, Mo.
September 12-13, 2022
Endnotes

Crew

Oklahoma City 300 294 285 879 +15
State of Missouri (1) 296 294 289 879 +15
UTEP 295 297 290 882 +18
Creighton 297 297 292 886 +22
Arkansas State 297 298 292 887 +23
Wichita State 293 304 302 899 +35
TX A&M CC 306 302 291 899 +35
South Dakota 302 304 296 902 +38
Southern Illinois 305 305 300 910 +46
Western Illinois 312 298 309 919 +55
State of Missouri (2) 311 311 306 928 +64
Murray State 312 310 309 931 +67

Omaha 318 311 304 933 +69
321 320 319 960 +96
Linden 315 326 332 973 +109

12 Murray State Racers 312 310 309 931 +67

T46 Payton Carter (2) 78 76 77 231 +15
T 51 Eliza Kho (1) 81 77 75 233 +17
T54 Alma Garcia (3) 77 78 79 234 +18
T64 McKenna Stahl (4) 76 81 81 238 +22
T72 Ellie West (5) 85 79 78 242 +26
T72 Kaitlyn Zieba (I) 79 84 79 242 +26
T76 Catherine Weir (I) 78 81 84 243 +27

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Review: Five Takeaways From the Gorillaz Tour Opening Night in Vancouver https://tinamania.com/review-five-takeaways-from-the-gorillaz-tour-opening-night-in-vancouver/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 05:40:57 +0000 https://tinamania.com/review-five-takeaways-from-the-gorillaz-tour-opening-night-in-vancouver/ Breadcrumb Links Music Entertainment Former Blur Creative and Collaborative Vocalist Damon Albarn Keeps Drawing and Shows No Signs of Letting Go English singer Damon Albarn (C) performs with his band Gorillaz at the Movistar Arena in Bogota on May 12, 2022. (Photo by Juan Pablo Pino / AFP) Photo by JUAN PABLO PINO /AFP via […]]]>

Former Blur Creative and Collaborative Vocalist Damon Albarn Keeps Drawing and Shows No Signs of Letting Go

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Gorillaz North American Tour

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When: Sept. 11, 7:30 p.m.

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Where: Rogers Arena

Tickets/info: livenation.com

Gorillaz, the virtual quartet consisting of vocalist/keyboardist 2-D, bassist Murdoc Niccals, guitarist/vocalist/keyboardist Noodle and drummer Russel Hobbs, kicked off their 22-date 2022 North American tour Sunday night at Rogers Arena.

Conceived in 1998 by former Blur singer Damon Albarn and visual artist Jamie Hewlett, the hugely successful project is a multi-platinum show unit whose latest project is a postmodern digital hit machine whose latest recordings have been released under the project name Song Machine where indie webisodes released new songs ranging from Momentary Bliss featuring British rapper Slowthai and punk rock duo Slaves to Pac-Man, released in honor of the video game’s 40th anniversary. These tracks were captured for a Song Machine album, Season One: Strange Timez in 2020.

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Always a fluid membership outside of Albarn, Gorillaz’s latest music has featured everyone from Robert Smith of The Cure to Malian singer Fatourmata Diawara and Elton John. The touring band tends to boast an equally impressive pedigree. Past tours have included members of The Clash, legendary soul singer Bobby Womack and many more.

Since hitting the road in 2022, the band have released more new songs, including Tormenta with Bad Bunny, Cracker Island with Thundercat and Greg Kurstin. This last track is also announced as the title of the next Gorillaz album, due out in February 2023. Setlists for concerts average more than 25 tracks drawn from the band’s eclectic career.

Here’s how opening night went:


Yasiin Bey and Damon Albarn of Gorillaz perform onstage at All Points East at Victoria Park in London on Friday August 19, 2022.
Yasiin Bey and Damon Albarn of Gorillaz perform onstage at All Points East at Victoria Park in London on Friday August 19, 2022. Photo by Scott Garfitt /Scott Garfitt/Invision/AP

1 — M1A1: After a charming walk on stage to a vocal loop saying “hello,” the dozen members of this iteration of the Gorillaz kicked off one of the band’s meanest tunes. Going from no speed to overdrive, they made their way into concert mode. It was also a mission statement, because it’s a very energetic and groovy show.

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Damon Albarn and Gorillaz perform onstage at All Points East at Victoria Park in London on Friday August 19, 2022.
Damon Albarn and Gorillaz perform onstage at All Points East at Victoria Park in London on Friday August 19, 2022. Photo by Scott Garfitt (Photo by Scott /Scott Garfitt/Invision/AP

2 — 19-2000: The shoe polish cool indeed. The quintet of backing vocalists had their ooh-ooh-oohs in swing and someone pulled a black lace bra on Albarn. His smile was as big as Murdoc’s on the giant save animation.

“You treat us like a golum,” Albarn offered – and then has to explain that he didn’t mean the “character of the Tolkien franchise.”


Damon Albarn of Gorillaz performs on stage at All Points East at Victoria Park in London on Friday August 19, 2022.
Damon Albarn of Gorillaz performs on stage at All Points East at Victoria Park in London on Friday August 19, 2022. Photo by Scott Garfitt (Photo by Scott /Scott Garfitt/Invision/AP

3 — Cracker Island: It is therefore a total slaughter in concert. From Thundercat’s visit to the video to the nasty double-step beat, this one is already a singing crowd. Players seem to like him too as he smiles all around. Albarn noted that it wasn’t a choreographed unit, so the dancing bassist and guitarist were just pumped up.


Damon Albarn and Gorillaz perform onstage at All Points East at Victoria Park in London on Friday August 19, 2022.
Damon Albarn and Gorillaz perform onstage at All Points East at Victoria Park in London on Friday August 19, 2022. Photo by Scott Garfitt (Photo by Scott /Scott Garfitt/Invision/AP

4 — El Manana: It’s not a ballad band or a love song band, but those slower melodic tunes proved to be the dominant part of the performance. The one who was never in place was often Albarn, who can growl and squeal like a soul man and belt like an altar boy. His frequent trips to the edges of the crowd and his rather ridiculous run over a baby in protective headphones being the ‘wise man’ proved that the former Britpop dandy is now a full-fledged Vegas storyteller.


Damon Albarn of Gorillaz performs on stage at All Points East at Victoria Park in London on Friday August 19, 2022.
Damon Albarn of Gorillaz performs on stage at All Points East at Victoria Park in London on Friday August 19, 2022. Photo by Scott Garfitt (Photo by Scott /Scott Garfitt/Invision/AP

5 — Dare: A smashing tour de force for exceptional backing singers, this time from Demon Days has long been a fan favorite and received hearty cheers – or three – from the crowd. At this point – song 17 or so – this party was raging. Gorillaz can clearly keep rocking for years to come, as the creative and collaborative well that Albarn continues to draw from shows no signs of drying up.

sderdeyn@postmedia.com

twitter.com/stuartderdeyn

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